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By Ear, Nose and Throat Surgeons of Western New England
April 19, 2017
Category: Procedures
Tags: Botox  

Years of smiling, frowning, talking and chewing can cause noticeable wrinkles to develop around your eyes. While this is a natural botoxprocess, it can age a person before their time. At Ear Nose & Throat Surgeons of Western New England in Springfield and Northampton, MA, our trained medical providers can eliminate those years of wrinkles with a Botox treatment. You've likely heard of Botox, but our staff has outlined more of the information about it here.

What is Botox?

Botox is the shortened name for botulinum toxin, which is a naturally occurring protein that, when sterilized and used in minuscule amounts, halts muscular movement. Cosmetically, a Botox treatment's purpose is to smooth out facial wrinkles by preventing movement of the muscles that cause them, particularly around and between the eyes. With these muscles temporarily paralyzed, the wrinkles that form over them gradually smooth out.

How is Botox applied?

Botox is mixed with saline and injected with a very fine needle into the targeted area of the face. Over a period of one to three days, the neurotransmitters associated with the muscles begin to respond to the treatment. At Ear Nose & Throat Surgeons of Western New England in Springfield, MA a cosmetic Botox treatment is administered in a clinical setting, ensuring safety, accuracy and cleanliness throughout the whole procedure.

How long does Botox last?

On average, our patients see results lasting three to four months, although each Botox treatment will vary based on the depth of the wrinkles and the individual response to the procedure. Botox can be reapplied approximately three to four times each year.

Interested in learning more about a Botox treatment in Springfield, Massachusetts? ENT Surgeons of Western New England also has locations in Northampton and Ware, Massachusetts. Contact one of our offices today to schedule a consultation!

By Ear, Nose and Throat Surgeons of Western New England
February 03, 2017
Category: ENT
Tags: hearing loss   Hearing Aids  

While losing some hearing as we age is a perfectly normal thing, some of us lose their hearing more severely than others. This hearing aidunfortunate situation can lead to frustrating or embarrassing social situations, especially if left untreated. Luckily, a hearing aid can help you regain control of your surroundings and restore your hearing to make your life easier. Learn more about hearing aids with your doctor at Ear, Nose & Throat Surgeons of Western New England in Springfield and Northampton, MA, and Mary Lane Hospital in Ware, MA.

How does a hearing aid work? 
Digital hearing aids pick up outside sounds and runs them through a state-of-the-art amplifier inside of the hearing aid. The aid then customizes the sound to your hearing loss and sends the sound out of a built-in speaker and into your ear. This amplified sound is easier to hear and allows you to hear sounds that your ear would not be able to pick up alone. Modern hearing aids use directional microphones & noise reduction strategies to eliminate amplification of background noise while helping patients understand speech in noise better than ever before.

Types of Hearing Aids in Springfield and Northampton, MA, and Mary Lane Hospital in Ware, MA
There are several options when it comes to hearing aids, allowing you to choose one that will work best with you, your ear and your lifestyle. While all of the aids can get the job done, with various options comes various price points, designs and sizes. Some of the most common types of hearing aids include:

  • Behind-the-Ear: These aids begin inside of and wrap around the ear. In the past, these aids were bulky and noticeable, but have slimmed down with recent technological advances.
  • Full Shell: Full shell hearing aids fit inside of the ear and are visible from the outside of the ear.
  • Half Shell: A half shell design also sits inside the ear, but is smaller than a full shell. While the full shell takes up the entirety of the inside of the ear, a half shell fits only inside the bottom portion.
  • In-the-Canal: ITC aids fit inside the ear’s canal and are very much hidden from view.
  • Completely-in-Canal: CIC hearing aids fit completely inside of the ear’s canal, hidden from view, and are the most discreet option for hearing aids.
  • Rechargeable: Rechargeable hearing aids come with the latest advancements in rechargeable technology. Lithium-ion batteries will keep you hearing all day long.

Hearing Assessment in PLACE
To determine the severity of your hearing loss, your doctor may recommend a hearing test. During this test, you will wear a pair of headphones through which your doctor will play sounds at different frequencies. You will locate which ear hears the sound. This test is crucial in diagnosing hearing loss and helps your doctor determine the best treatment plan for you.

For more information on hearing aids, please contact Ear, Nose, and Throat Surgeons of Western New England in Springfield and Northampton, MA, and Mary Lane Hospital in Ware, MA. Call (413) 732-7426 (Springfield), (413) 586-2033 (Northampton), or (413) 967-2249 (Mary Lane Hospital) to schedule your appointment today!

By Ear, Nose and Throat Surgeons of Western New England
December 23, 2016
Category: Procedures
Tags: hearing loss   Audiologist  

How your audiologists in Springfield, Northampton and Ware can help you

Your audiologist is a medical specialist trained to evaluate hearing loss in adults, children and infants. They also treat hearing loss by audiologistproviding hearing aids to people of all ages. When you visit an audiologist, you can be assured you are being treated by a person who holds a masters or doctoral degree in treatment of hearing disorders. Your audiologists at Ear, Nose & Throat Surgeons of Western New England in Springfield, Northampton and Ware, MA want to share some facts about audiologists and when you might need one.

If you have hearing loss, you are not alone; in fact more than 30% of adults over age 65 have hearing loss, according to the American Speech-Language Hearing Association. The ASHA also states that nearly 8 million people between the ages of 18 and 44 have hearing loss.

You may need the services of an audiologist if you:

  • Hear muffled speech or sounds
  • Can’t pick out words from background noise
  • Need people around you to speak more slowly or loudly
  • Can’t pick out consonants

One of the main procedures audiologists do is perform hearing screenings. Screenings are an inexpensive, quick method of finding out if you are losing your hearing. The ASHA recommends adults should have a hearing screening at least every 10 years through age 50, and every 3 years after the age of 50.

Your audiologists at Ear, Nose & Throat Surgeons of Western New England have offices in Springfield, Northampton and Ware to provide treatment if you do have hearing loss. They offer a full range of hearing aids and can recommend the type of hearing aid which will work best for you.

Visiting an audiologist can provide you with peace-of-mind, knowing you have the best care available for your hearing. When you get treatment for hearing loss from an audiologist, you will have a more positive view of life, greater self-esteem, and you won’t feel “left out” of conversations.

You don’t need to miss out on the sounds of life and important conversations around you. If you have hearing loss, it’s time to see the audiologists at Ear, Nose & Throat Surgeons of Western New England. They have offices in Springfield, Northampton and Ware, MA to serve you. Call today!

By Ear, Nose and Throat Surgeons of Western New England
December 16, 2016
Category: ENT
Tags: Hoarseness  

Whether from cheering on your favorite team or singing along to your favorite artist, losing your voice is never a fun experience. hoarsenessHowever, hoarseness can be a sign of something more than simple overuse. Find out what is causing your hoarseness with your doctor at Ear, Nose and Throat Surgeons of Western New England in Northampton, Ware and Springfield, MA.

Common Causes of Hoarseness
Hoarseness is defined as a sudden or abnormal change in voice and is usually caused by the inflammation or irritation of the vocal cords. Common causes of hoarseness include:

  • Infection: An upper respiratory infection, the most common cause of seeing a doctor in the United States, can make you lose your voice.
  • Laryngitis: The most common cause of hoarseness, laryngitis occurs when the larynx, which houses the vocal cords, becomes inflamed.
  • Gastric Reflux: This condition occurs when stomach acid travels up the esophagus and irritates the tissues in the throat.
  • Smoking: Smoking irritates the vocal cords, causing you to become hoarse. However, hoarseness in smokers should be examined by a healthcare professional to rule out things like throat cancer.
  • Overuse: Screaming, singing loudly, speaking loudly for an extended period of time or speaking loudly over a crowd in a noisy situation can cause hoarseness.
  • Allergies: Allergies can cause hoarseness due to coughing and other symptoms.
  • Coughing: Coughing puts added pressure onto the vocal cords, causing you to become hoarse. If you are coughing so much you lose your voice, you should consult your physician.
  • Nodules: Vocal cord lesions or nodules are similar to a callus which develops on the vocal cord, causing hoarseness.

Hoarseness Treatment in Northampton, Ware and Springfield
Most cases of hoarseness go away on their own within a day or two. Resting the voice is helpful in reducing inflammation and irritation which allows the body’s natural healing abilities to take over. If you are hoarse for more than two weeks, or if you are hoarse alongside pain, coughing up blood, have a lump in your neck or are having problems swallowing, you should see your ear, nose and throat doctor as soon as possible. Your doctor can help you determine the best course of treatment for your hoarseness.

For more information on hoarseness and its causes, please contact your doctor at Ear, Nose and Throat Surgeons of Western New England in Northampton, Ware and Springfield, MA. Call to schedule your examination today!

By Ear, Nose and Throat Surgeons of Western New England
August 05, 2016
Category: ENT
Tags: Ear Infections  

While more common in children, ear infections can happen at any age. Ear infections often clear up on their own after a few days. However, some infections require treatment from your ear, nose and throat doctor. Find out more about what causes ear infections and what you can do about them with your doctor at Ear, Nose and Throat Surgeons of Western New England in Northampton, Ware and Ear InfectionSpringfield, MA.

Ear Infection Symptoms
The most obvious symptom of an ear infection is ear pain. However, other symptoms can help you determine if you are suffering from an ear infection. In adults, they include ear pain, fluid drainage from the ear and muffled hearing. Children, especially those who cannot yet talk, may exhibit different symptoms, including:

  • tugging on the ear
  • problems sleeping
  • more irritable than normal
  • crying more than normal
  • balance issues
  • fever
  • loss of appetite

You should see your doctor if you or your child experience these symptoms more than a day or two, there is severe pain, you see blood or pus in fluid draining from the ear or if a child is under 6 months old.

Common Causes of Ear Infections
Ear infections can be viral or bacterial. The infection in the ear often occurs after the flu, common cold or allergies. Ear infections most often occur due to swelling and inflammation of the eustachian tubes, which regulate air pressure and drain the ear’s secretions. Children have smaller eustachian tubes, causing them to be more at-risk for ear infections than adults. Adenoids, which are pads of tissue located near the eustachian tubes, can also become inflamed to spark an ear infection.

Ear Infection Treatment in Northampton, Ware and Springfield
Your doctor uses various tests to determine the presence of an ear infection. Some ear infections go away on their own within the first few days. If your doctor recommends waiting to treat the infection, warm compresses and over-the-counter pain medications help relieve pain until the infection clears up. Antibiotics can treat bacterial ear infections. For recurring ear infections, your doctor may recommend ear tubes. These tubes, placed inside the ear canal, help drain fluids from the ear to prevent infection.

For more information on ear infections, please contact your doctor at Ear, Nose and Throat Surgeons of Western New England in Northampton, Ware and Springfield, MA. Call to schedule your appointment for an ear examination today!





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